Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Tactical, combat, military, law enforcement and home defense use of a Remington 870 shotgun.
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CJConrad
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Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by CJConrad » Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:25 pm

I have a new long-tube 870 that I am making more like the tactical model by adding:
#F403381 Rail & Ghost Ring Set Assembly $170
#F407616 18.5” Remchoke barrel (with Cerakote finish) $150
#F401501 Muzzle Brake Choke $ 44
Surefire Forend
All the typical replacement springs, etc

I now (after breaking it in, as suggested by Synchronizer) want to put a Cerakote finish on it to make it a lower-maintenance gun. I know that I want the baked Cerakote flat-black to match the new barrel.

I don't need to do the barrel (already Cerakoted from the factory), nor the forend nor butt stock (synthetics), but I am not sure what other parts I should expect to do. I want a quality job on all the parts that will practically benefit from it. While local to me (Charlotte, NC) would be best, I am willing to send it off to someone that has great reputation for doing this. I don't mind a 6-8 week wait, if needed. I've had quotes ranging from $100 to $300, but everyone is vague about what parts they apply this to.

Can anyone give suggestions as to what I should expect in the way of parts to be done, cost, and recommended high-quality places to do it for me?

Many thanks in advance!!

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Synchronizor
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Re: Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by Synchronizor » Sat Dec 14, 2013 5:20 am

Cerakote's website has an applicator locator page that should give you a good starting point for asking questions and getting quotes. There are at least a dozen listings in NC if you want to keep it in-state.

As for which parts, you're probably looking at having your receiver assembly, fore-end tube assembly, and magazine cap (or extension, if you want to add one) done. You could also have your bolt and/or carrier painted, but that would probably involve extra work and cost to have those assemblies stripped down beforehand and reassembled after. You may want to hand over your new barrel as well, either to have it repainted to better match the rest of the gun, to improve on the factory coat, or just as a color/texture reference.

These are just my thoughts; when you find someone to do the Cerakote job, ask them what they think. Odds are, this won't be the first 870 they've worked on.
CJConrad wrote:#F401501 Muzzle Brake Choke $ 44
While you're rounding up the rest of your build, and having other work done like drilling, tapping, and painting, it wouldn't hurt to keep an eye on sites like Ebay or Gunbroker. There are almost always listings for those chokes, and you can sometimes find them for a lot less than they would cost new.

Also, just to point out, the Tactical choke is a breaching stand-off, not a muzzle brake. I wouldn't expect any change in recoil beyond the negligible reduction due to the extra ounce or two it'll add to the gun's total weight.
CJConrad wrote:All the typical replacement springs, etc
Which springs were you planning on replacing? The Express Tacticals should already come with suitable springs for a combat/defensive build, so unless you want to change the feel of your trigger or carrier, or tinker with your magazine, you should be good to go. If you're really looking for the best of the best of the best ("Sir! With honors."), you could swap in the more corrosion-resistant Marine Magnum versions, but I'm not sure how much of a difference just a handful of those parts are really going to make.

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Re: Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by CJConrad » Sat Dec 14, 2013 6:08 am

Thanks for responding. The shotgun is the low-end Express (with the full-length tube), so it does *not* have the "tactical" parts on/in it. In researching, I found that most suggestions were to replace (which I have awaiting installation):
F16966 Carrier Latch Spring $ 5.29 Brownell's J02H04F
F16176 Extractor, Non-mim 17.99 Brownell's J04C09A
F17433 Extractor Spring 5.29 Brownell's J03D03B
Extension Spring Only 12ga 45" Long 7.55 Brownell's D35I04C

I chose to also put a larger safety head on it:
71022 Tactical Jumbo Head Safety RH 18.99 Brownell's J05P03D

Am I wrong to think that moving parts (e.g. bolt) aren't worth painting as they will quickly wear out the paint?

BTW, I put 10 rounds thru it today (only loading two at a time in the tube). I have two issues with the gun:
1. I sometimes had difficulty pumping to the next round (ie, it was stuck)
2. I don't like the release (probably not the correct term, but the serrated latch along the trigger guard that releases the forend). Is there a replacement that isn't so hard on the finger??

Thanks!

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Synchronizor
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Re: Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by Synchronizor » Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:54 am

CJConrad wrote:Thanks for responding. The shotgun is the low-end Express (with the full-length tube), so it does *not* have the "tactical" parts on/in it. In researching, I found that most suggestions were to replace (which I have awaiting installation):
F16966 Carrier Latch Spring $ 5.29 Brownell's J02H04F
F16176 Extractor, Non-mim 17.99 Brownell's J04C09A
F17433 Extractor Spring 5.29 Brownell's J03D03B
Extension Spring Only 12ga 45" Long 7.55 Brownell's D35I04C
The combat-suitable springs I was referring to were the heavy sear and extended magazine springs, which (as far as I'm aware) come standard on all Express Tactical models.

Though often recommended, the things you mentioned are not necessarily essential - or even helpful - "upgrades". Unless there was something actually wrong with the parts your gun came with, replacing them will not improve function or reliability. Some, such as the extra heavy magazine and carrier dog follower springs, (870s don't have a carrier latch spring) may actually have a slightly negative effect on function. I don't know who told you your extractor spring needed replacing, that's a new one to me. Your gun should already have the F17433 part, it's the same spring used in all 870s apart from the Marine Magnum and .410 models.

I'm not trying to attack your choices; confidence alone is reason enough for these "feel-good" upgrades, and if nothing else, it's good to have spare parts on hand. It just bugs me when misinformed individuals or commercially-motivated aftermarket companies blindly push these modifications without explanation or context. Even with things that actually change the gun's operating characteristics, any claimed advantages will invariably be accompanied by disadvantages, and the two won't always balance out on the positive side in every situation.
CJConrad wrote:Am I wrong to think that moving parts (e.g. bolt) aren't worth painting as they will quickly wear out the paint?
That would be my instinct, and there's nothing wrong with leaving the factory finish on the action parts, but you can have them painted if you want. The 870's moving parts will show wear no matter how they're finished; this is a normal part of the break-in process, and the gun will fit and function better as the contacting surfaces smooth each other out. If you break the gun in before having anything painted, the paint will show less wear, but some wear marks will develop over time. How much wear will depend on a lot of factors, including the properties of the paint itself. I've seen paint jobs where a different paint with different mechanical characteristics was used on the action parts.

These would be good questions for people with more hands-on experience with the various gun "kotes", or your friendly neighborhood Cerakoter.
CJConrad wrote:BTW, I put 10 rounds thru it today (only loading two at a time in the tube). I have two issues with the gun:
1. I sometimes had difficulty pumping to the next round (ie, it was stuck)
This is common when shooting steel-based shells in a brand-new chamber, especially if the ammo is particularly low-quality (such as Winchester Universal target loads) and/or the factory protectant wasn't cleaned out of the chamber before the gun was taken out and fired. Clean the chamber thoroughly and stay away from absolute trash ammo, and the issue should be significantly alleviated. Once you run more shells through the gun and it starts to break in, the problem should be virtually nonexistent (excepting the occasional defective or improperly-loaded shell, but that would be an ammo issue, not a gun issue).
CJConrad wrote:2. I don't like the release (probably not the correct term, but the serrated latch along the trigger guard that releases the forend). Is there a replacement that isn't so hard on the finger??
The correct name for that part is the action bar lock, though it can also be called the slide release or action release - especially when referring specifically to the bit of it that extends below the trigger plate.

I am aware of one aftermarket action bar lock with an oversized release tab; the Tank's Wide Action Release. It seems like the kind of thing you're looking for, but it's not exactly a drop-in part. It requires at least a partial disassembly of the trigger plate assembly, destructive removal and replacement of the hammer pin, and permanent modification of the trigger plate itself. If you don't have a lot of experience with the 870, this is probably best left to a gunsmith.
Image
Seeing as you've only put 10 shells through the gun so far, I'd suggest sticking with your factory action bar lock for the time being. Working it shouldn't be difficult or awkward once you get used to it and the gun breaks in and loosens up, and you can always take a bit of sandpaper to the serrations if they're too sharp. Modifications that involve permanently altering the gun's major components should not be done lightly.

CJConrad
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Re: Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by CJConrad » Sat Dec 14, 2013 1:54 pm

Hi Synchronizer -- as always, thanks for a speedy and helpful response!!

I was shooting 1oz Remington Rifled Slugs -- about 10 years old, but I *think* to be good ammo. It "stuck" 3 out of the 10 times. At least one needn't worry about a live round in the chamber while trying to "unstick" it, but it is irritating.

Regarding the extractor spring, I found it in a list here:
http://www.rem870.com/forum/viewtopic.p ... 7433#p7652
After doing much reading, this was the first I found where the poster was kind enough to give the part numbers so I could actually order them, so I went with it. I think you followed his post with comments as well, but didn't challenge this part.

Anyway, if it isn't an improvement over what shipped with the gun, I'll keep it in the "spare parts kit".

Thanks!!

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Synchronizor
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Re: Cerakote Finishing -- Details and Cost?

Post by Synchronizor » Sun Dec 15, 2013 11:48 am

Remington ammunition is usually pretty good-quality stuff, but like most other major ammo manufacturers, Remington has switched to steel bases for most of their shotshells (though they do still offer some excellent premium shotshells with brass bases). Even brass-colored bases are usually steel; you can check by holding a magnet against the side and seeing if it sticks. Steel bases are cheap, and work well enough if built right, but they don't cycle as well as real brass. Brand-new 870 chambers can be a little rough, so it's normal to experience some post-firing hang-ups with steel-based shells - even quality ones - until the chamber breaks in. The chambers also get coated with oil or grease at the factory to protect the metal from corrosion during shipping and storage. If not cleaned out, this stuff can exacerbate the issue, especially if it collected dust or other crap between the factory and you.

There are three different 870 extractor springs, part numbers F17433, F14806, and F97599. F14806 springs are only used in .410 models, while F97599 springs are more corrosion-resistant parts used in 12ga Marine Magnum 870s. All other 870s - as well as the 870's semi-automatic relatives, the 11-48, 1100, 11-87, and 11-96 - use the standard F17433 extractor springs.

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