Aluminum trigger group

Discuss all accessories and upgrades available for the Remington 870 shotgun: stocks, forends, barrels, chokes, magazine extensions, followers, safeties, sights etc.
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Bourget117
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Aluminum trigger group

Post by Bourget117 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:39 am

I'm thinking of upgrading my trigger group on my new marine magnum. I'm wondering if I should try and find a used 870 trigger group and swap all the nickel plated marine parts onto it or just try and buy an entire new aluminum trigger group with nickel parts.

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Synchronizor
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Re: Aluminum trigger group

Post by Synchronizor » Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:51 pm

Getting a complete trigger plate assembly would probably be the best choice. There are a lot of little parts to keep track of in the trigger plate assembly, some need to replaced after they've been removed, some need to be specially fitted to make the unit function safely and reliably, and others need to be installed in a specific sequence. Basic things like changing the safety, sear spring, or shell carrier are pretty simple, but it's gunsmith-level stuff to do a full swap.

Why do you want to switch to aluminum, though? I think the polymer trigger plates are superior, especially for a gun that will see rough use.

sodapopsixtysix
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Re: Aluminum trigger group

Post by sodapopsixtysix » Wed Mar 29, 2017 6:58 am

I'm comfortable keeping the polymer trigger plate on my Marine Magnum, especially given the conditions that it may be subject to. Does anyone know if it's true that Wilson Combat uses the polymer part on their scattergun builds?

Bourget117
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Re: Aluminum trigger group

Post by Bourget117 » Wed Mar 29, 2017 12:57 pm

sodapopsixtysix wrote:
Wed Mar 29, 2017 6:58 am
I'm comfortable keeping the polymer trigger plate on my Marine Magnum, especially given the conditions that it may be subject to. Does anyone know if it's true that Wilson Combat uses the polymer part on their scattergun builds?
Most of the scattergun techs I've seen have the polymer group. Not sure if it's because they start off with an express model or if it's because they think it's better to have than the aluminum one.

Bourget117
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Re: Aluminum trigger group

Post by Bourget117 » Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:02 pm

Synchronizor wrote:
Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:51 pm
Getting a complete trigger plate assembly would probably be the best choice. There are a lot of little parts to keep track of in the trigger plate assembly, some need to replaced after they've been removed, some need to be specially fitted to make the unit function safely and reliably, and others need to be installed in a specific sequence. Basic things like changing the safety, sear spring, or shell carrier are pretty simple, but it's gunsmith-level stuff to do a full swap.

Why do you want to switch to aluminum, though? I think the polymer trigger plates are superior, especially for a gun that will see rough use.
I did not realize that there were so many parts involved. Your right, I would be better off buying a new marine trigger group in aluminum. I even thought of buying a used one and having it cerakoted or NP3'd to keep the finish looking good. Buy again that would involve removing and instlling a lot of small parts.
As for the polymer, I just never liked the idea of it. I know my MM Is New and will probably last but it just seems cheap to have such an important part made out of plastic. Especially when Remington makes and offers an aluminum version.

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Re: Aluminum trigger group

Post by Synchronizor » Sat Apr 08, 2017 5:35 am

Keep in mind that the aluminum trigger plates are powder-cast aluminum, not machined from high-quality billet alloy. There's a big difference there. Properly-selected and -formulated modern plastics, on the other hand, have excellent impact resistance.

Durability aside, I really like how the plastic trigger plates don't show wear & tear as much, since their material is black all the way through. A single light scratch on painted aluminum stands out like a sore thumb.

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